RA recruitment 2017-18

RAs answer, "Why become an RA?"

I became an RA because I wanted to have a positive impact on girls younger than me. I wanted to be able to play that older sister role and be able to encourage them to reach their full potential while in college. I want to help change lives of students one day at a time.


When I applied to be an RA, I knew I wanted to be a college professor. I felt it was important to know how to communicate and work with college students. Being an RA, I can better understand student needs and concerns and help support them in their future goals.


Truthfully, I became familiar with Residential Policies when I was deemed "responsible" for a guest violation during my first year. It was a sanction that, to my friends was minor, but to me had a monumental impact. It truly made me re-evaluate the influences of my peer groups. I decided to apply to be an RA because I wanted to create an identity that was all my own. I wanted to have a positive impact on the experiences of other VCU students. I accepted this position for the same reason I accepted the position to be an undergraduate teaching assistant. The Resident Assistant role provides a leadership experience where I am actively challenged and constantly learning about my residents, my staff members, and myself. This position has also been a financial blessing! It has saved me well over $20,000 and my parents are certainly thankful for that! This position has been a integral part of my college experience and will be reflected on with fond memories upon my graduation in May.


I applied because I wanted to find myself, and I definitely have. I have become a more outgoing, dedicated, organized, warm and loving person, simply because I was given the avenue to thrive through the RA position. I have stayed an RA for three years because I have found my passion for helping others and making my fellow peers lives a little easier. The position has also given me so many opportunities to be involved in different areas on campus, and I feel that I have truly found my home here at VCU. Helping others to find their place at VCU through my position as an RA has been the best and most rewarding part of the job.


I love being a RA because I met new people and I feel more involved on campus. The stipend and free housing allows me to not have to work as much at my other job and take pressure off of my mother. I am truly thankful for this job.


I have a handful of friends that became an RA before I did, and being with them walking around campus they always knew someone to address whether it be in passings or in the same locations, like "oh that's my resident" or "he/she is an RA as well" & such of the like. & to me that's community --that's a RAMily that I wanted to be apart of because I felt like knowing all these people who you may or may not have made friends with if it wasn't for us all being here for the same purpose as an RA and VCU student, I may not be as diverse in my thoughts, opinions and experiences as I could have been. I enjoy helping others, building their confidence, helping them enhance their purpose in life and to keep moving forward.


My why is simple: making a real impact. In high school, I was introverted and had very few friends. After coming to college, my RA freshman year made and effort to bring everyone out of their room and have us know each other on some level. She made sure each and everyone of us felt like we belonged at VCU, and if we didn't, she would make sure she helped in some form, whether it be just talking to us or getting us some resources to help. Because of her, I was drawn out my high school facade and began learning who I was. She was the one who encouraged me to get involved with the university, and that's what led to me earning my current position as an RA. She made an impact in my life and helped me grow. That's my why. I want to make an impact in my residents life's and help them grow and explore who they are. Even if I have a fraction of an influence on my residents that my RA had on me, then that's enough.


My why is simple: making a real impact. In high school, I was introverted and had very few friends. After coming to college, my RA freshman year made and effort to bring everyone out of their room and have us know each other on some level. She made sure each and everyone of us felt like we belonged at VCU, and if we didn't, she would make sure she helped in some form, whether it be just talking to us or getting us some resources to help. Because of her, I was drawn out my high school facade and began learning who I was. She was the one who encouraged me to get involved with the university, and that's what led to me earning my current position as an RA. She made an impact in my life and helped me grow. That's my why. I want to make an impact in my residents life's and help them grow and explore who they are. Even if I have a fraction of an influence on my residents that my RA had on me, then that's enough.


Initially, I came into VCU knowing that I wanted to potentially be an RA because both of my parents had been at their institution. They had talked about the influence they knew the position had, and also the ability to have an impact on the lives of people even if it doesn't seem to be that substantial in the moment. When I arrived at VCU, my first-year RA help to further solidified my desire to be an RA. She was attentive and understanding of our situations, as well as very patient. I know it must have been a pain for her to plan programs that she thought we would be interested in, for us to act as though we were "too cool for school" to attend. I never saw her with a negative attitude, and I actually had the pleasure of her being my colleague my first year of being an RA. What made me stay was truly my colleagues and professional staff. This job is not for the faint of heart or those just trying to get free housing and meals paid for. Yes, those are definite perks, but at the end of the day (at least for me) it's who you work with that either makes or breaks this position. The residents can be awesome, but they are also human and have diverse and difficult personalities and quarks to deal with at times. If I didn't have a staff each year that I knew had my back and vice versa there is no way I would be in my third year of being an RA. It wouldn't have been worth it. You have to have a strong support system and a trust in the capability of others to be able to do their jobs or when the rubber meets the road it'll be a catastrophe in the making. Not only this, but a trust in the capability of you yourself to be able to perform your job. If there is one thing this job has taught me, it's confidence. I definitely don't have all the answers, but I do have the ability to confront any situation and the knowledge to know when I need to call in for help.